Pathfinders Ensures Quick And Efficient Sea Floor Roaming For Aiding Transatlantic Seafloor Research

If our future generation still relies on Jason Junior or JJ, the underwater video capturing machine used for discovering sunk Titanic on 1986, that needed to be connected with a cable and operated from another ship on the sea surface, it certainly would not be able to bring out expected result. Pathfinders transatlantic seafloor research concept has been designed with all the facilities and abilities that is expected to be able to find even Captain Nemo’s Nautilus one day.

Pathfinders innovative underwater vehicle has been designed to roam on the oceans floor up to a standard depth of 4000+ meters or 2.5 miles in the quickest possible time. Designed by Phil Pauley, this creation will certainly enhance the interaction between human and mysterious, unexplored under water ocean world. The vehicle is powered by electric energy through Lithium storage and is equipped with life support systems along with an emergency escape system for all three crews, the pilot, a co-pilot and a communications engineer. Pathfinders contain four wheels or tracks or a combination of them to propel through the sea floor and minimum two side propulsion devices to move it in mid-water. Finally, a support vessel will remain at the surface for control and help recovering the vehicle in case of emergency by providing crucial power and life support.

Designer : Pauley Interactive

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4 thoughts on “Pathfinders Ensures Quick And Efficient Sea Floor Roaming For Aiding Transatlantic Seafloor Research

  1. The treaded version reminds me of the "Seeteufel" midget submarine. It was one of many deranged ideas the Germans came up with during WWII. They either wanted tanks to crawl underwater or mini-subs to go on land.
    We may never know…
    The only problem is, the sea floor is full of canyons, sinkholes, hills, loose sediment, uber strong currents and a thousand other things you probably won't see in time to drive around.
    But it would kick @$$ in the tourist industry in areas with safer bottoms.

  2. Captain Nemo?! Don't bother following the Nautilus. Everyone knows he's retired to Rapture. He's probably having martinis with Andrew Ryan as we speak!
    PS: I already tried jacking the Nautilus. Don't bother. Nemo woke up as soon as I broke into the bridge. That old geezer has some MEAN plasmids!
    PSS: Seriously! Every day he puts on his own Big Daddy suit and kicks some giant squid @$$…for exercise.

  3. Apps for:
    Search Rescue, mapping, marine salvage, tender, MedEvac, Submersible Rescue,
    Marine archeology, Tech Sys testing, Harbor clean up, Roving scout, lay sensors.
    Undersea Tours: add Pod for 20 passengers?
    Bouy tender,
    clear netting, debris from wreck site.

  4. Mr. Russell, this design may not be suitable for some of your applications. TWO WORDS: Turning Radius.
    I can't see this thing being particularly useful (nor practical, nor safe, nor effective) for search and rescue, MedEvac (helicopter vs submarine? Thanks Nemo, but I'll wait for da choppah!) or submersible rescue (you're reasonably f***ed when your submarine's escape system fails). Marine archeology? Archeology requires you to be light and delicate. Light or delicate this does not look. Not bashing you, Stephen (great ideas), just putting my two cents in.

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