Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar was Inspired by Ferrari and Gothic Architecture

Inspired by the legendary auto manufacturer, Ferrari, and Gothic architecture, Jeremy Han Donghun has designed Ferrari Gothica Rossa. It’s a design study proposal to provide you a glimpse of designer’s vision how future vehicles might look like. You can read his explanation below.

The Ferrari Gothica Rossa is a supercar concept inspired by the construction process and the beauty of Gothic architecture. By combining Gothic architecture’s 3 key elements as well as its unique assembly method, this concept provides a new innovative and beneficial way for the construction layout, and chassis of future vehicles, where lightweight, efficiency, and structural rigidity is crucial.

Apart from its wedge shape design, the main inspiration for the design of this vehicle, which is Gothic Architecture, introduces the structure and design of future supercars. This highly distinctive characteristic particularly sets the Gothica Rossa concept from other supercars.

Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han Donghun

Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han Donghun

Gothic architecture and Ferrari are similar. The former is regarded as an invaluable work and is listed in UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, the latter claiming the title as ‘the most expensive car in the world (1962 250 GTO)’ at auctions each year, as well as claiming victory in numerous motorsports, and of course, being called “the most beautiful car in the world”. The only difference is that the former is a building and the latter is a car.

Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar utilizes a groundbreaking whole new vehicle frame / chassis architecture where tubular frames encompass the entire main body of the vehicle. An improvement of the space frame we currently have today, this structure, inspired by the process of Gothic architecture, provides further structural rigidity while making the vehicle light as possible.

Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han Donghun

Thanks to the Gothic style of architecture, there are buildings of height, size and formality that we have never seen before. In addition, this architectural style has an excellent durability that does not disintegrate even after more than 700 to 800 years have passed. Thus, I applied the Gothic style that brought innovation in the architecture itself and tried a breakthrough design to the vehicle.

Recalling the advantages of Gothic architecture, I studied the key elements of Gothic architecture and the order in which the buildings were built. Pointed Arch, Ribbed Vault, and Flying Buttress are three of Gothic architectural features that shape the Ferrari’s design.

More images of Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar:
Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han DonghunFerrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han DonghunFerrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han DonghunFerrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar by Jeremy Han Donghun

A fascia inspired by the pointed arch and overlapped with ‘X’ shape theme was undertaken. In addition, the ribbed vault is a high structure that overlaps a cylindrical structure, and it has secured a lot of space for the vehicle. And last, but not least, the largest element of Gothic architecture, the flying buttress, is completely separated from the wall to support the pressure of the outer wall. The flying buttress, which is often found in exotic mid-engine cars, is also notably present in the Ferrari Gothica Rossa Concept Supercar. By evolving this feature one step further, I have designed the flying buttress to continue smoothly from the front cowl to the fender without interruption. This design not only emphasizes the identity of the vehicle but is both air-resistant and structurally safe.

The frame of the vehicle is divided into three parts and assembled together. Frames are similar to today’s spaceframes, but they are more advanced and support the entirety of the vehicle.


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